Nurses: Lets talk about charting

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The dreaded beast of charting. We truly spend more time ‘defending’ our job than actually doing our job. The act of charting  is a necessary evil that we will never escape.

We all remember the ‘chant’ we heard during our basic education:

“If it wasn’t charted, it didn’t happen”

More importantly…. we need to learn how to appropriately chart. Not everyone charts the same…… ugh.

Here are some talking points about this dastardly responsibility that might come in handy:

1. Pre-charting??
2. Be thorough, but concise and consistent.
3. Did we take care of the same patient?
4. Ins & outs!
5. Do your part with the required pathways.

I’m not a big fan of charting, but it’s here to stay. And while it’s here, how about we get better at doing it?

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

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I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

Nurses: Have you ever called your patient Hunny, Hun, Sweetie..?

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Have you ever called your patient Hunny, Hun, Sweetie or other ‘terms of endearment’?

Are they really terms of endearment? Or are they unintentional derogatory or offensive terms? [Our patients’ perception is their reality]

How would you know these words offend your patient? How would you know they were not? Communication with our patients is a key element of our job. This is a topic that should be approached within the first or second interaction with your patient. I would implore you not to assume these terms are ‘safe’ and acceptable for all patients.

How do you feel about Nurses being called ‘babe’ at the workplace?

Things that make you go hmm.

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

Snapcode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

5 absolute nevers in Nursing

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Everybody knows to not scream, “BOMB” on a plane. Sheer panic, terror and mass hysteria will ensue. Anarchy is a kind way of describing what would happen on that plane once those words were uttered (screamed).

Those words (or actions) also exist in the world of Nursing. There are just some things you don’t DO or SAY in our profession. While there are a lot of them that we could list, I wanted to share a handful of these “Nevers” that are true no matter where you go within the acute care setting.

Nursing is a tough job, but we like to have fun.

Here are five things you just DON’T say or do in Nursing. Period. Non-negotiable. Five things that have serious side-effects.

1. Saying the ‘Q’-word
2. Saying “I’m bored”
3. Give your confused patient your real name
4. Say that you “have plans after your shift” out loud
5. Answer your phone on your day off

Never do any of the above…. Ever. Never-ever-never-ever-never-EVER. Ever-never. [Did I get my point across yet?]

You’ll thank you me later.

Check out my rant in the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

Snapcode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean