2 silly mistakes every Nurse will make during a code blue

2 silly mistakes every Nurse will make during a code blue

We’ve all been there.

Code Blue faux pas. I’ve decided that there should be some basic rules when running a code.

Not knowing what to do can be downright humorous sometimes. Everyone has that first time being in charge of the meds during a Code Blue.

Yes, I’m poking a lil’ fun at the lack of familiarity. During the ‘code’, bystanders and extra staff can sometimes be thrust into a role that they may not be ready for. Whether a lack of staffing, the emergency nature of the ‘code’ or the good ole’ fashion ‘close rule’, there are Nurses that will have to man the medications during one of the most stressful experiences as a Nurse (especially a NEW Nurse)

We stumble through which drawer has the correct medication and all of us have struggled with the ‘quick release’ medication box….

I’m poking fun…. because in a galaxy far, far away… I was once that Nurse.

This is my humorous way of helping you avoid my faux pas. May the force be with you.

P.S. Yes, there are rules to running a code blue and one of them is properly trained team members. This scenario is just a comical experience I’ve encountered. No patient was harmed during this experience. 

Check out the video below. While you’re there I hope you’ll subscribe to my YouTube channel:

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions, and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

 

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I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

5 easy ways a new graduate Nurse can survive their first day in the ICU

5 easy ways a new graduate Nurse can survive their first day in the ICU

Being a new Nurse in the ICU is a tad bit mind-boggling and overwhelming.

Have you heard of the “deer in headlights” analogy before? That panic-stricken pale-faced zombie that has a hard time stringing the word “T-H-E” together. Yes, that level of fear.

The ICU was scary enough when we were students; now shit just got real. You got hired on as a staff Nurse. You’re going to have to learn how to be one of “them.”

I mean it’s one thing to rotate through the ICU as a student. But now you actually have to transition from student Nurse to graduate Nurse!

The good news? It’s survivable. In fact, it’s dare-I-say exciting!!! You’re exactly where you want to be. Aside from actually learning how to do the job you were hired for, I thought I might give you a couple of super-easy pointers to help you exchange oxygen a lil’ easier on your first day (or first several weeks).

*Hint: “exchange oxygen = breathing”; you’re gonna wanna do that often

Here are some suggestions you can use on day one that might help ease your transition:

  1. Get a (small) notebook.
  2. Brush up on your Math skills.
  3. Work on that ‘thick set of skin.’
  4. Critical care resource books.
  5. Get comfy with the Mechanical Ventilator.

Check out the video below.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions, and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

 

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I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

Respiratory Therapists are appreciated by Nurses

Respiratory Therapists are appreciated by Nurses

Respiratory Therapists are an integral part of our health care team, and more often than not Nurses have failed to recognize the work they do. They do more than just deliver oxygen.

The collegial relationships I have developed with the Respiratory Therapists that I have worked with over the years has been invaluable. To say they are needed is an understatement.

Some Nurses may not understand just how difficult their job is. I thought I’d share five things to help us remember just how important these specialists are:

  1. They work the same grind we do
  2. They have the same minimum education requirement
  3. They deal with the same crap we do
  4. They are the go-to for all things pulmonary
  5. They are not there just to do the job you don’t like to do

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

 

snapcode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean