The infamous 75 question barrier of the NCLEX?

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Who’s idea was it to share this tid bit of information? Every Nurse has lived through this torture of knowing ahead of time the “Pass or Fail” golden ratio of the NCLEX.

Oh, you know you’ve heard it.

If the computer shuts off at 75 questions… you most likely passed (meaning you did really well).
If the computer continues on, it doesn’t feel you’ve proven your safe-level of intelligence as an entry-level Nurse.

Some outliers will get all 275 questions because they are a random ‘tester’ for new test questions. Other outliers will have the computer shut off at 75 question.. and fail.. because you performed that poorly.

SERIOUSLY.

I would have rather not known this information when I took my NCLEX.

Did I mention, when I took this exam over a decade ago, my computer screen shut off at 100 questions?

Grr.

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

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I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

What about a student Nurse purchasing “RN” merchandise?

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Is it bad Mojo to actually own paraphernalia with the letters “RN” before you’ve actually earned the title? Or is it just confidence?

That really nice stethoscope, or watch, bracelet or charm….

What about the RN going back to school for their advanced degree?

Is it bad luck to purchase merchandise with those credentials prior to taking the exam and being awarded the title (CRNP, CRNA, etc) ?

When I was a student nurse (all three times) I refused to purchase anything with my ‘future’ credentials. I thought it would throw a whammie. I didn’t dare buy that merchandise for my (possible) future. Yep, I was superstitious. I waited until I passed that infamous exam.

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment. I release a video every day!

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

Snapcode

I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

I remember 'taking a blood pressure' was really hard…

2015-07-25 12.56.57I volunteered at a School Open House recently where I helped with free Blood Pressure screening. It was a good time. Kids running around like kids do. Parents visiting and teachers doing there best to corral the madness.

I had an epiphany during that entertaining morning. Blood pressure measurement isn’t something that I really have to ‘concentrate’ on. It doesn’t require much self-talk. I just simply do it. Hand me the cuff, sphygmomanometer and stethoscope and I’m good to go.

But I remember quite vividly how stressful taking a blood pressure used to be. Back when I started this journey. I remember practicing on my friends, practicing on my classmates.

  • Where does the cuff go?
  • Which direction does the tubing go?
  • What about that little valve-thingy.. which way do I rotate it to inflate and deflate the cuff?
  • What about my stethoscope! Where do I place the metal head (yeah.. couldn’t remember the word diaphragm)
  • And, and the needle as it goes up… how far do I pump up the cuff? 180? 220? is there such a thing as too much? Or too little??
  • What’s that sound called again… the Korotkoff sound thingy?
  • When do I hear the sound? When does the sound disappear?
  • Wait.. which one is sytolic? Which is diastolic?

As you can see the list goes on and on. Stress can be quite the enemy if you let it.

My point?

Growth. The amount of growing one does in our profession. We start small and we develop one skill at a time. Master one skill and tackle a new one.

When I started this profession I got stomach ulcers performing blood pressure measurements and now I’m charged with managing the overall care delivery of the sickest of patients. I place central lines, intubate patients, manage mechanical ventilators and pull patients from the brink of death.

I’m here to tell you that anything is possible, you just have to want to learn and work for it. I’m living proof.

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