Nurses. Can critical thinking skills be taught??

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The elusive unicorn of the Nursing profession, critical thinking skills. The bread and buttah of how it’s done. The silver lining to all-things Nursing.

The mettle of a Nurse is usually tied to this illustrious skill. A skill… that unfortunately, in my opinion, is not something you can just teach. Nor can you read it out of a book.

It’s not a palpable skill, it’s not an educational topic you can study, and it’s surely not something that you are given.

I strongly feel it’s a skill that every Nurse needs to acquire.

It IS a skill that develops with deliberate practice, constant use and time in grade.

Here are five suggestions I have for honing your craft and sharpening this skill. A skill that will definitely improve if you follow them.

1. Understand the normal.
2. Understand and have great self-awareness.
3. Know the what (HPI).
4. Know the why.
5. Know the why-not.

Care to weight in? Any additional suggestions? What has been your experience?

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat@seanpdent:

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I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean

Nurses: Don’t get caught up in the Do’ey things..

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We all get overwhelmed and sometimes buried with the endless amount of tasks required. Our mind races every time we enter each patient’s room.

We have a “flight of ideas” …. and every thought possible starts racing through our mind. We get so consumed by the thoughts that we focus solely on the actions of our hands performing the tasks needed.

Do’ey things: the education, psychometric, and anthropomorphic skills needed to complete a physical task.

..[heard inside your head]

..what med am I giving?

..did I call that family member back?

..what about that drainage, did I document that?

..or was that my other patient?

..are these medications compatible?

While these tasks are vitally important, don’t get so caught up in the Do’ey things that you forget the one thing that matters the most.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat@seanpdent:

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I hope to hear from you soon.

Not all Nurses make good preceptors

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In our profession, preceptorship has become a passive and assumed thing simply because of time-in-grade.

“Well, since you’ve been a Nurse long enough, could you precept and teach the new Nurse on the unit?”

Being a preceptor is more than just supervising an inexperienced worker. You have to be an educator, a mentor and disciplinarian. But you need to adapt to the students needs at any given moment.

Patience is a requirement. You have to patiently slow down your workflow and teach by the numbers, something that is much easier said than done.

We all tell stories, know stories and have heard the horror stories of bad preceptors. Don’t trip and play a role in another one of those stories.

Just because you can do the job, doesn’t mean you can teach the job. We need to learn how to teach.

What are your thoughts? Care to share your story? Maybe provide some insight for the next class?

Check out the video below. Click the title, head on over to my Facebook page and leave me a comment.

Don’t forget to share the video! If ya like what ya see…. tell someone. Hell, tell someone if ya don’t like it.

As always, thanks for watching and thanks for sharing. I love hearing from everyone.


If you haven’t noticed, comments have been disabled on my blog. I would love to hear your comments, questions and concerns.  So let’s connect. Or drop me a message on Snapchat @seanpdent:

Snapcode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope to hear from you soon.

 

-Sean